Top 10 Cybercrime Specialist Jobs

According to the FBI, crime pays pretty well sometimes, at least for a while. And cybercrimers are hiring. Like the rest of the workforce, crooks are specializing. In this speech, Steven R. Chabinsky, FBI Cyber Division Deputy Assistant Director, discusses the top 10 crooked specialties:

1. Coders/programmers, who create the means to commit the crime.

2. Distributors or vendors, who broker the goods (and bads).

3. Techies who build and maintain the nuts and bolts, including databases.

4. Hackers, who find and finesse the systems containing the data.

5. Fraudsters, who create and deploy the tricks that gather the treats.

6. HOSTers, who hide the servers and sites that do the heavy-lifting and storage behind botnets and proxy networks.

7. Crashers, who create accounts and sell them to other criminals for a fee.

8.  Money mules, who open bank accounts and transfer $ around.

9. Tellers, who use transfer $ between currency services and between different world currencies.

10. Leaders, who may be as technical as your grandmother or even less. According to the FBI, “They’re the “people-people.” They choose the targets; choose the people they want to work each role; decide who does what, when, and where; and take care of personnel and payment issues.”

Read it here. About halfway down, look for the sentence, “Here are the 10 specializations we see in a typical cyber crime.”

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Read my other top 10 posts.

3 Comments

Filed under Employment, Security, Top 10

3 responses to “Top 10 Cybercrime Specialist Jobs

  1. I’d like to add P.O.S. integrators to this list. These guys are doing a criminally bad job for their customers.

    Like

    • ITauditSecurity

      Grayson,
      Are you equating P.O.S. integrators with cybercriminals? I would agree that I’ve heard that too many of them are rather pathetic.

      Like

      • Maybe that’s a bit of a stretch, but they are certainly enabling the entire rest of the carding underground. Integrators are just drawing my ire at the moment because we are running into the same basic mistakes over and over again. CC data in the clear, no firewalls, open remote administration and weak passwords. This is not exactly high speed stuff.

        Like

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